Motorcycle Words

a motorcyclist's blog

Author: Brandon (page 1 of 8)

Mobile Device Mounts Review at wBW

webBikeWorld Contributor Bill P. takes an in-depth look at four different mobile device mounts for motorcycles. Personally I use the Ram Mount X-Grip as it is light and I don’t do any off-road riding on my Ninja 1000 ūüôā but I do agree with Bill’s findings. While his favorite is also the most expensive in the roundup, one does get what they pay for in this case.

See the full review and comparison by clicking here.

From the review…

Many motorcycle owners are now mounting a smartphone on their motorcycle.¬†Not that I’m advocating taking and making actual phone calls; indeed, most of us try to get away from that aspect of our lives when we ride.

So no, that’s not what I’m talking about.

It’s for things like music streaming using Bluetooth connectivity through your intercom system.¬†And there are riders who don’t want to get lost, period.¬†I’m sure many of you, like me, use GPS apps on your phone while on a ride and consider it essential.

www.webbikeworld.com

Happy Ride to Work Day!

Today,  Monday June 19th, is international Ride to Work Day and hopefully many of you were able to get out and make the commute on your bike today. Here in Nashville is was still wet and a little drizzly from our overnight rain but precipitation was pretty minimal at 6:30 this morning. Still, I saw many riders on the streets  this morning on my way into town from Brentwood.

If you’re not familiar with Ride to Work Day, it is more than just a day to commute on your ride. Ride to Work is¬†a 501 c4 non-profit organization, advocating and supporting the use of motorcycles and scooters for transportation, and providing information about everyday utility riding to the public.

You can get more info over at www.ridetowork.org .

Pilot Omni Air Mesh V2 Overpants Review – wBW

Just in time for summer, my review of the Pilot Omni Air Mesh V2 overpants is now online at webBikeWorld.com. ¬†This are a great way to make a two piece hot weather suit when combine with the Direct Air V3 mesh jacket also from Pilot. I’ve had a lot of Pilot gear coming through for review this year an I’ve been really impressed with the bang for the buck offered by the brand.

Features like Pilot’s RedTab system and the thin, but present, tailbone protector are sma¬†ll details that demonstrate someone at Pilot designed their gear with real world riders in mind. Pilot not only makes textile technical gear like these pants but they also make custom leather racing suits that are very popular with AMA/MotoAmerica road racers.

Check out the full review here.

Pilot Direct Air V3 Mesh Jacket Review | wBW

My review of the Pilot Motosports Direct Air V3 jacket was just published today over at webBikeWorld.

The Direct Air Jacket V3 combines free-flowing mesh material with solid textiles in the impact zones.¬†This makes the jacket feel a bit more sturdy than other “full shell” mesh jackets.¬†But it does so at the expense of some air flow.

Pilot has upgraded the protectors used in this jacket as well as the waterproof liner.¬†It’s now a REISSA membrane lined with polyester mesh.¬†Usability features like Pilot’s Red Tab system and “At Hand” pocket are present and those are details we also really appreciated in the Pilot Trans Urban V2 jacket we reviewed recently.

Read the full review (click here)

        

Motorcycle Review: The CSC TT250

Today webBikeWorld has published my review of the CSC TT250 dual sport motorcycle. You might recall my first look at this bike right after got it home a few weeks ago. Now that we’ve had some time to spend with it and taken photos, we’ve got a full first impression review of the TT250.

These Chinese sourced bikes may get some sideways looks from the motorcycling community here in the United States and I get it. Taking the plunge into these very affordable machines can come can come with certain risks.

I think what CSC is doing here with their bikes is taking steps to reduce the risks by offering parts and good customer service. One does pay a premium for one of their bikes over what one might get from other online Chinese motorcycle/scooter dealers but that cost includes some peace of mind.

For the price ($2,195.00 USD) you are still getting quite a deal for a new 250cc motorcycle (229.9cc actually) and you have a one year, unlimited mileage warranty. Not too shabby, but does it work? Hit the link below to find out.

Check out the full review.

 

Elena Myers on Mental Preparation

Elena at Barber Motosports Track

Former AMA Pro racer Elena Myers published a great article on mental preparation and racing over on the McGraw Powersports blog. Even if you’re not a racer or have aspirations as such, it is still a good read. It also makes a good point about how being prepared mentally for riding (on the track or anywhere) is an important part of creating the best riding experience.

Here’s a short teaser…

When you’re swapping paint with your competition at over 180 miles per hour on the straights, with 50+ degree lean angle in the corners, there’s a lot that needs to be right. Split second decisions have to be made not just to win, but to stay upright. In the blink of an eye, you could be off the track or crashing into another rider. There’s no room for error. This is why being mentally prepared is crucial for professional motorcycle racing.

Click here to read the full article.

VW/Audi Considering Sale of Ducati?

Reuters is reporting that Volkswagen might be looking to sell Ducati. In the wake of VW’s diesel emissions scandal, the automaker¬†has been working to streamline its operations and reduce costs as it prepares to pay out hefty fines and compensate owners of affected vehicles.

As part of this streamlining effort, there is speculation that Ducati might go up for sale. Nothing is concrete but there are indicators that this could be a thing. Volkswagen AG owned Audi purchased the Ducati brand back in 2012 for over 900 million (USD) so it makes sense that if the right buyer comes along, this could really help boost VW’s bottom line .

Read the full story over at Reuters.

There’s a New Lid in Town – Shoei RF-SR

Rick and “Burn” have just wrapped up their review of the newest¬†addition to¬†Shoei’s helmet lineup, the RF-SR. ¬†The new RF-SR is now the lowest priced member of the full-face lineup coming in at $399.00 (MSRP). Despite the low price you still end up with a lid that has the feel and fit that Shoei wearers have come to expect over the years.

While $399.00 might not sound like a budget helmet, it still is quite the bargain for those looking to move into Shoei for the first time.  Despite being on the low end of pricing  you still get great features like four shell sizes and excellent ventilation that are typical of the brand.

The initial offerings for colors is a bit thin with just solids available in black, grey, white, blue, and “tangerine”. Black and grey offer a matte finish option as well but no Hi-Viz or other bright colors are shown right now. Hopefully more will be on the way later this year.

Sounds interesting? Check out the full review over at webBikeWorld.com

Pilot Motosport Dura Overpants Review

The Pilot Dura pants are basic motorcycle riding pants that function well.¬†But they’re probably not equivalent to the Pilot Trans Urban V2 jacket (review) from a value perspective.

Pilot has upgraded the knee protectors in the Dura pants compared to the Pilot Omni mesh pants we reviewed. Otherwise, the Dura over pants are more of an evolutionary update rather than a revolutionary one. There are a lot of things to like, however, such as full-length side entry zippers and a permanent waterproof liner.

Also, the Pilot “RedTab” system for locating the connection points is helpful.¬†And the overall build quality of the Dura over pants is very good.¬†However, there are a few small details that could be addressed which would really help the Dura pants shine in the crowded sub-$200.00 arena.

Check out the complete review over at webBikeWorld.com

         

Neck Braces for Street Riding – Yae or Nae?

Being a bit of a riding gear “nerd”, I recently started following some discussions on ADVrider.com regarding neck braces. These aren’t the kind one gets put in after an accident but rather the opposite. These are the kind that attempt to prevent the need of the “post-crash” ones.

Off-road riders have been using the collars and braces for years but there hasn’t been much on the consumer market for the street rider. Over the past fifteen years or so, there have been a lot technological strides in the neck brace area due on no small part to Christopher Leatt, who patented his design for the Leatt neck brace back in 2003.

Where once there were just padded collars (or “donuts”) the Leatt Brace had a framework of flexible and rigid parts designed to keep a rider’s head from flexing to the point of causing injury. This design requires that the rider be wearing a full-face helmet and it works by presenting a surface around the rider’s neck that physically stops the helmet from moving beyond a certain point.
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